Tuesday, February 7, 2023
HomeOphthalmologyChoroidal Rupture

Choroidal Rupture

Background

Choroidal ruptures are breaks in the choroid, the Bruch membrane, and the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) that result from blunt ocular trauma (the most common eye injury).

Choroidal rupture can be secondary to indirect or direct trauma. Cases secondary to direct trauma tend to be located more anteriorly and at the site of impact and parallel to the ora, whereas those secondary to indirect trauma occur posteriorly. These ruptures have a crescent shape and are concentric to the optic disc. Indirect choroidal ruptures are almost 4 times more common than direct ruptures. See the image below.

A 23-year-old man was in a motor vehicle accident

A 23-year-old man was in a motor vehicle accident 2 months before his presentation. His visual acuity is 20/400, and an afferent pupillary defect is present. Traumatic optic neuropathy and choroidal rupture are observed. This is a red-free photograph. (Courtesy of Jorge Gutierrez, MD.)

View Media Gallery

Mid-phase fluorescein angiogram in a 23-year-old m

Mid-phase fluorescein angiogram in a 23-year-old man who was in a motor vehicle accident 2 months before his presentation. (Courtesy of Jorge Gutierrez, MD.)

View Media Gallery

Late-phase fluorescein angiogram in a 23-year-old

Late-phase fluorescein angiogram in a 23-year-old who man was in a motor vehicle accident 2 months before his presentation. (Courtesy of Jorge Gutierrez, MD.)

View Media Gallery

RELATED ARTICLES
- Advertisment -

Most Popular