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Dermatologic Manifestations of Lymphogranuloma Venereum

Background

Lymphogranuloma venereum (LGV) is a primarily cutaneous, and sometimes systemic, sexually transmitted disease (STD), which primarily affects lymphatic tissue of the groin. LGV is caused by unique serotypes L1, L2, and L3 of Chlamydia trachomatis. LGV occurs only sporadically in North America, but it is endemic in many parts of the developing world. An outbreak of LGV proctocolitis has been reported among homosexual men in North America and Europe, and many of these individuals were co-infected with HIV.

See the image below.

Lymphogranuloma venereum is caused by the invasive

Lymphogranuloma venereum is caused by the invasive serovars L1, L2, or L3 of Chlamydia trachomatis. This young adult experienced the acute onset of tender, enlarged lymph nodes in both groins. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons (Herbert L. Fred, MD, and Hendrik A. van Dijk, http://cnx.org/content/m14883/latest/).

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